Being UU at Home Altar Gallery

This gallery presents some of the home altars shared by the GUUF community in response to Being UU at Home Lesson 3: Creating a Home Altar. Read the captions beneath each picture to learn more about the altars and the people who shared them.

A home altar shared by Lydia Wilson.
This home altar was shared by Lydia Wilson.
This altar was shared by Rebakah Tower. "My name is Rebekah. I'm an eclectic pagan, and I worship a Goddess named Naamah. 
".... My altar is in the East corner of the room because that is where the sun rises. I have pictures above my altar of people who have passed away. My son John is in the dark wooden frame. My Uncle Carl is just beneath him.
"When we first visited GUUF, a Buddhist monk came to speak to us. He gave us Buddhist meditations, so I hung them on the left hand side. I have some artwork hung up on the wall as well and most of it is sacred to me. 
"On top of my altar, on the left side, I have a statue of Buddha for good fortune, a small lamp and some incense. At the bottom left corner, I have a statue of a woman diving. The woman is a symbol of water, which is in the West. I also have a skeleton from a sea anenome that my father gave me. 
"On the middle of the altar, I have 3 candles, which symbolize the triple nature of the Goddess. I have a lot of little statues of the Goddess. I have a dove because sometimes people release doves when they worship Naamah. She is also honored with white flowers. I have a chalice that is sometimes used to hold wine and a little box for personal memories. In the very center of the altar, I have small clay hands. When I worship Naamah, sometimes I will put a gift from someone I love into those hands, like an offering.
"On the right hand side of the altar, I have an elephant that heats candle wax. Fire represents the South. I also have a bell, which I don't use very often but can be used in ritual. I have a mortar and pestle to grind sacred herbs. My son made a little clay sunshine for me, so I keep that too. There is a little clay pot filled with beads and a wooden bowl full of sacred stones. These represent the North. I also keep an athame (knife) on my altar. This is very rarely used during ritual to draw lines for magical boundaries during spell work. I prefer to just talk to Naamah most of the time, so I don't usually do spells.
"I love my UU family and miss you all very much." - Rebekah Tower
This home altar was shared by Rebekah Tower. Read her description below:

“My name is Rebekah. I’m an eclectic pagan, and I worship a Goddess named Naamah. 
“…. My altar is in the East corner of the room because that is where the sun rises. I have pictures above my altar of people who have passed away. My son John is in the dark wooden frame. My Uncle Carl is just beneath him.
“When we first visited GUUF, a Buddhist monk came to speak to us. He gave us Buddhist meditations, so I hung them on the left hand side. I have some artwork hung up on the wall as well and most of it is sacred to me. 
“On top of my altar, on the left side, I have a statue of Buddha for good fortune, a small lamp and some incense. At the bottom left corner, I have a statue of a woman diving. The woman is a symbol of water, which is in the West. I also have a skeleton from a sea anemone that my father gave me. 
“On the middle of the altar, I have 3 candles, which symbolize the triple nature of the Goddess. I have a lot of little statues of the Goddess. I have a dove because sometimes people release doves when they worship Naamah. She is also honored with white flowers. I have a chalice that is sometimes used to hold wine and a little box for personal memories. In the very center of the altar, I have small clay hands. When I worship Naamah, sometimes I will put a gift from someone I love into those hands, like an offering.
“On the right hand side of the altar, I have an elephant that heats candle wax. Fire represents the South. I also have a bell, which I don’t use very often but can be used in ritual. I have a mortar and pestle to grind sacred herbs. My son made a little clay sunshine for me, so I keep that too. There is a little clay pot filled with beads and a wooden bowl full of sacred stones. These represent the North. I also keep an athame (knife) on my altar. This is very rarely used during ritual to draw lines for magical boundaries during spell work. I prefer to just talk to Naamah most of the time, so I don’t usually do spells.
“I love my UU family and miss you all very much.” – Rebekah Tower
A closer view of the items on Rebekah Tower's home altar.
A closer view of the items on Rebekah Tower’s home altar.
"This is a temporary altar I constructed on the floor in an area of my house that is in transition to help me meditate on change and impermanence." - David Funderburk
“This is a temporary altar I constructed on the floor in an area of my house that is in transition. I built it to help me meditate on change and impermanence.” – David Funderburk
A meditation table with decorated rocks, candles, a chalice, statues, and readings, shared by Patricia Carson.
“This week we enhanced our existing prayer/meditation table by decorating rocks with aspirational words that are important to us.” – Patricia Carson and family
See more images of the Carson family’s decorated rocks below.
Colorful painted rocks with messages such as "Kindness," "Family," "Hope," "Abundance," "I hope you don't get the sickness," "Self control," "Gratitude," "Shine Bright, and "Forgiveness."
Decorated rocks for the Carson family’s meditation table
A girl holding a painted rock with a rainbow and the word "family"
A rock from the Carson family meditation table
A girl holding a painted rock with the words "I hope you don't get the sickness."
Another rock from the Carson family meditation table

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